Posts Tagged ‘professional photographic paper’

Wedding Photo Tips | A Few Faves

In my next life I think I will come back as a wedding photographer. It would be nice; people have suggested it to me and I might actually have what it takes… Especially when it comes to identifying – or even helping to create – the moments that will be treasured for a lifetime.

There’s no debating that we live in a DIY world: Technology has made many things possible. It seems that everything is readily available, more affordable, and of comparable quality. This is somewhat true. Nevertheless, I must point out that: 1) knowledge and experience remain indispensable, and 2) you get what you pay for.
wedding photo disk image

What to do with that wedding disc:

Many couples opt to receive a disk – typically a DVD – in lieu of a traditional wedding album. Now what? For those content to view the images on your computers or television screens, this tip is not for you. However, if you’re traditional and appreciate the nostalgic aspect of wedding portraiture you will be interested to in this pro tip – courtesy of Reed Photo:

Print on quality photographic paper.
“This means professional paper. Not the over contrasty, over saturated non- neutral stuff you get from drug stores, discount marts, warehouse/membership stores. This means use a good pro lab. Not Costco, not Wal Mart, not Walgreens, not Drug Emporium, etc etc etc.

The papers you get from consumer mini-labs are purposely manufactured to NOT have accurate color. Yep, they make it screwy on purpose. You see, Joe Consumer likes prints with colors that aren’t real. They want more saturation and contrast for that extra snap. In most cases, their photos benefit from that assistance to help the snap-shot look a bit more appealing to the eye.

Professional paper is manufactured to very exacting standards to achieve neutral balance, neutral saturation and excellent skin tones. Pro papers will handle extra saturation if you really need it for your “look”, so add it if you wish, but at least you have the option. And get this, just by using pro papers, you get an additional stop of shadow detail! The missing shadow range in the consumer papers is another reason they look so “snappy”. A properly exposed, correctly white balanced image with great composition that is printed on professional photographic paper won’t need the false extra punch to look good.” –by John Harris, ReedPhoto.com

Timing is everything

Speaking from experience, you can never have too much time scheduled for wedding photos. Plan on extra time, and then add more. Why? Because you have no control over time. Anything can happen: Limo gets a flat, grandma and grandpa get lost, flower girl is crying, bridesmaid zipper fail, flowers arrive late, unexpected rain – are you starting to get the picture? The trick to this timing thing is adding (using) the extra time in a way where your guests won’t be affected.

I found a great blog post written by Traci Turchin describing a variety of wedding photography timelines – including modern and traditional scenarios.

The Reveal (aka First Look)

I love this one! Many of our couples have done this and all have been thrilled with the outcome! A number of them even commented that it’s a tension reliever. One of the benefits I like most is that it makes for amazingly unscripted candid shots. From the perspective of the couple it is especially romantic, and they can be more intimate and relaxed since they are not surrounded by dozens of guests. This is how we typically stage it: We lead the groom to a place that is semi private, and he is turned away from the direction of the bride’s entrance. The bride walks toward the groom, and taps him on the shoulder to signal him to turn around and face. (sigh!) It’s so cool to watch this special moment unfold! Sure, it’s a break from tradition but wedding photography has evolved so much in the 20 – 50 plus years since your parents and grandparents were married.

Ultimately, the choice is yours so discuss the pros and cons ahead of time. I sincerely believe that you should be open to any approach that reduces pressure or stress on the wedding day. In my experience, the private reveal / first look works particularly well if the wedding and reception are at the same location – such as a hotel, B&B or country club. It is most definitely (in my Martha Stewart voice) “a good thing”.

© 2011 E. Delgardio All Rights Reserved

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