It’s Only A Wedding, Sit Anywhere

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There are 127 seats – just pick one.  Really.  We’re cool like that, so when you come to our wedding sit anywhere.  Except at the Reserved tables.


When you invite people to an event, do them a favor and tell them where to sit.  They want to know.   After all, you are the host (hostess) and they are expecting to take direction from you.  They don’t want to make decisions and run for tables like seats on a bus. (Hey Barb – save me a seat!)

I often hear “We went to a wedding (party) and they didn’t have assigned seats and I thought it was great”.  Ok.  And some people like eating with their fingers, but that doesn’t mean it’s appropriate in all settings or at all times.

“. Large receptions, over 30 people, can be chaotic if there is no assigned seating. Often couples elect not to assign seating because they don’t want to offend anyone who ends up seated in the back. But, honestly, guests feel more comfortable when they know where to sit. They won’t have to battle for a “good seat” or argue over who sits by whom. Etiquette and courtesy dictates that parents of the bride and groom and elderly family members or friends should be seated in the front. Do the best you can to seat families or groups together. You won’t be able to please everyone, but don’t sweat it. Most people won’t stay in their seats for long anyway.”   Source: www.bridalgathering.com

We have a saying in the business:  Asses in seats.  It’s the way things are done.  Leaving people to sit anywhere is like saying you don’t care where they sit.  And Reserved cards at tables don’t cut it.  If you really want to offend someone, tell them they can’t sit at the tables reserved for…. Umm…. who exactly are they reserved for?  (Personally, I’m never quite sure since it doesn’t say anything more than “Reserved”)

reserved sign

Creating a seating plan doesn’t need to become a major ordeal.  There are resources available to assist with this task, such as  Perfect Table Plan.   Also, sites like WeddingWire.com and TheKnot.com  have helpful (free!) tools for seating charts and table layouts.  If you don’t want to mess with creating placecards, contact our friends at PlaceCards.com.

About The Author

Elisa

Planner | Designer | Speaker I've been planning for as long as I can remember! When I was younger, I planned birthday parties for my siblings and surprise anniversary parties for my parents. I spent many years in the Hospitality industry and also studied Interior Design. I couldn’t have guessed that my creative and organizational talents would lead me to a career in event planning...seriously! "To love what you do and feel that it matters - how could anything be more fun?" - Katherine Graham

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Author this web sitehttp://www.aflairforaffairs.com

6 Comments Add Yours ↓

The upper is the most recent comment

  1. 1

    Brilliant advice Elisa and I couldn’t agree with you more! Not having assigned seating when you’ve got say 50 guests or more is just asking for trouble.

    “And some people like eating with their fingers, but that doesn’t mean it’s appropriate in all settings or at all times.” – I’m going to be quoting this a lot!

  2. 2

    Thanks Adam!

  3. J Cruise #
    3

    I’ve surfed the net more than three hours today, and your blog was the coolest of all. Thanks a lot, it is really interesting.

  4. Terence #
    4

    Very valuable information; many people overlook this.

  5. 5

    Agreed!

  6. Gina M. #
    6

    Thank you for the blog post, you make some excellent points! We were going to go with open seating at our wedding but I’m rethinking it now. Guess my MIL will be happy – lol!



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