How Not To Become Bridezilla – Part 2

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As a follow up to my previous post, I wanted to share some thoughts and observations on dealing with the stress associated with planning a wedding.

Common stressors stem from personal expectations, important decisions that must be made by you and your fiance, the involvement or interference of family members, time constraints, financial circumstances and so on. Depending on your situation, you may experience some of these challenges or struggle with all of them. It’s inevitable. Planning a wedding is not only a major investment of time and money, it’s a process that’s fraught with difficult choices. And if you’re generally hard to please or have a demanding or controlling personality, you’ll likely experience an even greater level of stress.

The stress level that a Bride-to-Be (or engaged couple) feels radiates in a ripple effect and can negatively impact the planning and flow of the wedding. It’s important to keep your cool and not CREATE the chaos you’re trying to AVOID.

{image via Weddingbee}

wedding calendar

A (Bakers) Dozen Tips to Calm your Inner Bridezilla

  • If you’re feeling uneasy, consider getting help from a trusted friend, family member or professional (TRUST YOUR GUT)
  • Remain flexible & keep an open mind
  • Brush up on the etiquette of being a good hostess/host
  • Establish a budget and be careful to mind it; when finances are strained, stress will increase proportionately
  • Keep your expectations in check: while your wedding is a high priority for you, resist the urge to boss and be discourteous to others (family, bridal party, vendors, etc.)
  • Pick your battles wisely
  • Keep the significance of the day in perspective  (Start your new life off on the right foot!)
  • Manage your time & energy – don’t allow the wedding planning process to take over your life
  • Don’t take on too much (DIY); spreading yourself too thin is a recipe for disaster
  • Pre-condition yourself to be accepting of the need to make compromises
  • Decide in advance that “whatever will be will be” – inevitably, things go wrong but proper planning should minimize this.  And some things are just beyond anyone’s control (weather, mechanical failure, illness, etc.)
  • by Sharon Naylor

    by Sharon Naylor

  • Wedding Insurance may provide some additional piece of mind (Venue, Hurricanes, etc.)
  • Consult resources (such as blogs and books) designed to help lend support during the planning process
  • WIN THE BOOK!

    Would you like a FREE copy of Sharon Naylor’s book? Share your “Bridezilla moment” with us! We’re looking to hear from Brides, Grooms, Friends and Planners (just about anyone, really- lol!). Our staff will pick three favorite stories or comments and send the winners a copy of “The Bride’s Guide to Diplomacy”    Winners will be selected on February 15th, 2010.    {Spread the word!!}

    © 2010 E. Delgardio All Rights Reserved

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    About The Author

    Elisa

    Planner | Designer | Speaker I've been planning for as long as I can remember! When I was younger, I planned birthday parties for my siblings and surprise anniversary parties for my parents. I spent many years in the Hospitality industry and also studied Interior Design. I couldn’t have guessed that my creative and organizational talents would lead me to a career in event planning...seriously! "To love what you do and feel that it matters - how could anything be more fun?" - Katherine Graham

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    Author this web sitehttp://www.aflairforaffairs.com

    2 Comments Add Yours ↓

    The upper is the most recent comment

    1. cassie #
      1

      Nice post & good information!

    2. Cindy #
      2

      Good advice!!! i def need to calm down and start enjoying my planning



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