Posts Tagged ‘tips’

“Twedding Tweetiquette”

Just for fun…

Because I am a Twitter fanatic, I had to share this gem of an article!

Tweet My Wedding? The Dos and Don’ts of “Twedding Tweetiquette” by Juliette Powell, Huffington Post:


Of the six weddings I was invited to this summer, four weren’t just weddings. They turned out to be what I have begun to think of as “the twedding.”

You know you’re at a “twedding” when:

1. Your wedding invitations were sent via the micro-blogging site Twitter.com.
2. All aspects of your big day have been vetted by your twitter followers who suggest everything from wedding guests to wedding vendors.
3. Members of the wedding party take “candid” photographs and videos of the ceremony and upload them directly to twitpic and twitvid for community commenting.
4. Your wedding becomes a trending topic on Twitter.
5. The groom tweets “I’m married” before kissing the bride. 

Read the full article “Tweet My Wedding? The Dos and Don’ts of Twedding Tweetiquette”  by Juliette Powell of the Huffington Post ….

24

08 2009

Still Hot! {Tips for a Sensational Send-off with Sparklers!}


We seem to get an incredible number of requests for sparkler exits! And why not? – it’s an awesome and affordable photo op! However, there’s often more to coordinating a sparkler exit than meets the eye! While sparklers are generally safe when used as intended, they still require careful handling. So, I’ve prepared some simple tips to help you plan a safe and sensational send off!

Tip #1 – Purchase the right sparklers:

Ideally, you should be looking for the metal rod type in a length that’s either 14″ or 20″ long. Shorter sparklers (8″ or 10″) will burn out too quickly for most staged exits, unless it’s for an intimate group.

Morning Glories are attached to wooden rods (sticks) and have 3 distinct burning phases – usually a red flame for about 20 seconds, then a crackle/snapping phase for 20 seconds, and finishing off with 20 seconds of a green/white flame. Since Morning Glories tend to drop small glowing particles (think of burning tissue paper) they must be used with extreme caution. It’s truly frightening to think of these fiery particles landing on skin, hair or clothing during a staged exit, so I avoid them at all costs.

Tip #2 – Displaying and Discarding Sparklers:

One of the best ways to display sparklers is to fill a pretty painted pail or metal urn with white sand and insert the sparkler rods into the sand. This way, the sparklers will stand upright, and the sand base will provide the weight needed to prevent the display from tipping. Since the receptacle can get quite heavy once the sand and sparklers are added, it’s best to assemble this nearby to the area where the exit will take place, if at all possible.

On one or two occasions, I’ve seen sparklers placed on the guest tables or at each place setting (like a favor might be placed) but in those cases, they were also shorter than the recommended length, and in my opinion not a very attractive addition to the decor.

It’s important to remember that following the sparkler exit, the rods will be hot and need to be collected with care. The sand filled urn or pail is an ideal receptacle; guests can just place the burned end of the sparkler rods into the sand where they can properly cool down before being placed into the trash. Other things that work well are metal trays, a baker’s sheet cake pan, and heavy duty foil pans; ideally, receptacles should be placed nearby to both the left and right sides of the exit line up.

Tip #3 – How to Use Properly & Safely:

I always carefully consider the number of people to be involved, as well as the size and layout of the space. Naturally, we look for an outdoor location such as a wide walkway, a courtyard or driveway, for these options seem to work best. Before the Bride & Groom exit, we organize the line up of guests so that they are shoulder to shoulder and can hold their sparkler out and away from themselves. This is much safer than a staggered line where guests must reach around each other.

Secondly, we have our staff or a few designated helpers assist with the lighting. We start at the point where the Bride and Groom will begin walking and work our way towards the furthest point. We use butane lighters or sterno fuel (cans) to get the sparklers started – the constant flame is the key! We proceed at intervals – every 5 or 6 people – because a lit sparkler can also light other sparklers; this is an organized approach which speeds the process. A few strategically placed tiki torches also work nicely. Remind guests to take turns lighting their sparklers; it’s unsafe to light multiple sparklers simultaneously.

It’s important to maintain a safe distance from the newly wed couple as they make their way through the line up. Even though the sparklers are relatively harmless, it’s better not to take chances; I avoid creating an ‘arch’ to prevent sparks from falling onto the couple. Likewise, if children are involved, they must be closely supervised; a parent may even want to give their attention to the child’s safety and protection rather than holding a sparkler.

In my experience, if there are more than 100 or so guests participating in the send-off, it becomes more difficult to get the timing of the lighting and exit just right. Whenever this is the case, I suggest that the wedding party send off the Bride and Groom as the other guests watch – this cuts the number of participants down significantly! It’s also an excellent way to control costs.

Skylighter is an excellent online resource for sparklers and realted pyrotechnic products, and they have posted some wonderful pointers and valuable infomation on their website page for Wedding Sparklers .

Photo Credits: Art Faulkner, Elegant Imagery, Misty Miotto

© 2009 E. Delgardio All Rights Reserved

Add to Technorati Favorites

Hip Tips – How to Personalize Your Wedding

Monogram, gobo, wedding graffiti, favors, Buena Vista Palace wedding; DeanFoto.com (2007) Today’s brides and grooms are very savvy and typically look for an elevated level of customization and personalization. Much like “brand building”, they look for every opportunity to incorporate monograms, logos and motifs into their wedding. Many of my couples have at least some experience with graphic design and they astound me with their creativity and resourcefulness! Other times, they call upon our expertise to help them create a cohesive look. It’s not difficult to pinpoint a few areas where details can easily be incorporated to unify event design.

Fonts: Download one or two custom fonts and use them exclusively on all the wedding stationery and printed accessories (place cards, programs, etc.). Favorite sources: My Fonts and dafont

Motifs and Monograms: The possibilities are endless! Use these on invites, programs, table decor, gobos, adhesive decals (such as Wonderful Graffiti), the wedding cake, favors, etc.

Motif, wedding cake, table cards, Lake Mary Events Center wedding; A Flair for Affairs (2008)Color Themes: Color can be used in so many ways to achieve so many different things! Color themes are most impressive when colors are carefully matched to prevent discord (accidental variations). When using color to support other event themes (think of a Tiffany theme) pay close attention to the use of color for maximum impact – sometimes less is more. One of our favorite online inspiration sources for color themes: Style Me Pretty

As a wedding planner and event designer, I use all of these techniques, plus a few other signature stylings and personalized enhancements to boost the {FAB} factor of every event. I truly appreciate variety and don’t feel that every details needs to match completely. However, it is important to note that when you begin drawing the guest’s eyes to details, they best be well coordinated and tailored to compliment each other.

For more pictures of stylish weddings and events please visit our Wedding and Event Galleries.

© 2009 E. Delgardio All Rights Reserved

Add to Technorati Favorites

26

03 2009

Tips for Brides & Grooms: Protecting Yourself in Today’s Uncertain Economy

According to The Wedding Report, wedding spending has declined significantly since 2007 – almost by 30% (averaged) overall. The vast majority of wedding vendors can attest to the a downsizing of wedding budgets, as well as a drop off in bookings (new clients). Consultants and Coordinators in particular have seen postponements and cancellations spike in recent months.

Everyone is feeling the pinch; while engaged couples are trying to save, Photographers, DJs, Consultants and Venues are trying to survive. Competition for new bookings is fierce, thus creating a buyer’s market which gives couples shopping for wedding vendors and services more purchasing power. But how can you spot a “true bargain”? I’d like to offer a few tips to help you make a sound investment:

1. Perform a Status Check – Do your homework to determine if the vendor’s company is healthy. A healthy company is “current”, meaning they have an up-to-date presence, including a website featuring pictures of current staff, projects and client testimonails. A company that is healthy is typically involved in Professional Associations, and may be known as a leader in their industry. Healthy companies are growing (even now) and are gearing up for a great 2009-2010 wedding season. Look for current blog posts, quick responses to emails and phone calls, and positive recommendations from others (friends, vendors, etc.).
2009 Wedding Client, Portofino Bay
Look for evidence of
a well established business
with a proven track record.

2004 Wedding Client, Maison & Jardin

2. Beware of the high pressure sales pitch: The best vendors are eager for your business but not desperate.

3. Beware of Part-Timers: A part-timer (sometimes known as a ‘moonlighter’ or ‘weekend warrior’) may be able to offer a very competitive price, but do they have the equipment and experience to deliver the quality of product or service you are looking for? What is their stake in the success of your event and are they driven to ensure your complete satisfaction? Does the Vendor’s Contract protect both parties?

4. Beware of Start-Ups: The poor economy has spawned a huge number of start-up businesses; people who have lost jobs or need extra income are becoming entrepreneurs. On one hand, it’s beneficial to the market to have more affordable options, but who is the person behind the start-up? Do they have any experience with weddings? Will they grow tired of this new business venture in 6 or 9 months and leave you in the lurch? Is it worth the risk to hire someone with no track record?

5. Beware of “Free”: “Free” is a hook; it’s a term that often denotes an extra added value. Conversely, free also has no refund value, so like it or not, you’re stuck with it. (ex: “That free album you gave me was poor quality.” “The free candle centerpieces only lasted halfway through the reception.” …Get the picture?)

For additional pointers on what to look for when hiring a professional wedding planner and coordinator, please visit A Flair for Affairs website.

Add to Technorati Favorites

f